Human Rights

The mission of the UWUA Human Rights Committee is to provide advocacy, training and support to UWUA local unions and members in the areas of Human Rights/Civil Rights, and all matters of discrimination in the workplace

The UWUA Human Rights Committee was formed in 1971 and is dedicated to its mission statement: “To provide advocacy, training and support to UWUA local unions and committee members in the areas of human rights, civil rights, and matters of discrimination in the workplace. The committee’s priority is to help ensure and support diversity and inclusion in union representation, and diversity and inclusion in energy jobs.

From the UWUA Constitution:

As our union membership and the communities in which we live evolve, we must expand our conception of diversity and embrace all workers. A diverse and inclusive labor movement is essential to connecting with and representing the workforce of the future, where women workers, workers of color, and young workers are the clear majority. Additionally, we must ensure that our union remains a beacon of opportunity for military veterans, experienced workers, LGBT workers, workers with disabilities and workers of every faith

Equality is a shared struggle. Civil and human rights do not serve “special interests.” To succeed as a union, we must embrace the practices of inclusion and nondiscrimination in carrying out every endeavor at every level of our union. Only by coming together will we be able to transform an economy that has favored corporate interests over people, built wealth for the very few, and lowered expectations for what’s possible for working Americans.

Only by coming together will we be able to transform an economy that has favored corporate interests over people, built wealth for the very few, and lowered expectations for what’s possible for working Americans.

The UWUA urges local unions and regional bodies to make sustained and conscious efforts to build diversity in their organizations—at the leadership level and in the hiring of key staff.

The Human Rights Committee is integral to the work of our union and an essential resource. The committee is available to provide local unions with: communications assistance; training, including – biases, diversity, communication and conflict resolution; complaint processing with an emphasis on fostering union relationships instead of conflict; and assistance with organizing with an emphasis on organizing the growing diverse population.

The Human Rights Committee is integral to the work of our union and an essential resource.

The Human Rights Committee complements the work of the Young Workers Initiative Committee and Women’s Caucus, and stands ready to assist in realizing each group’s goals

The UWUA will actively engage in legislative and policy advocacy on issues of importance to diverse groups of workers to lend support and demonstrate our commitment to these communities.


The Human Rights Committee can provide the following for you and your local:

  1. Design, customize and implement skills building workshops for large and small locals.
  2. Provide threat assessment support for local officers. (We help evaluate negative situations and provide solution-based advice.)
  3. Develop a local union human rights person or committee.
  4. Diversity and/or communications training for your officers or local membership.
  5. Assist with organizing.

The Human Rights Committee members support the five regional districts of the National Union.

Region I: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Puerto Rico and other Caribbean Territories

Milagros Valentin-Grantham
Region I Local 1-2
mvalentin@uwua.net
(718) 472-0160

Matt Marfione
Region I Local 369
marfionem@yahoo.com
(781) 254-5556

Region II: Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington DC, West Virginia

Clint Carson – Human Rights Committee Chair
Region II Local 102-G
dalepriceinc@yahoo.com
(724) 531-9135

Region III: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas

Murphy Ball
Region III Local 270
balljrm@sbcglobal.net
(216) 346-6173

Eric Richardson, Chair
Region III Local 544
ebgj5@sbcglobal.net

Region IV: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin

Nate Waters
Region IV Local 105
earlwaters@aol.com
(248) 396-1638

Craig Massey
Region IV Local 223
craigmassey@local223uwua.org

Region V: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, Guam and other Pacific Rim Territories

Kelli Lacy
Region V Local 132
Krazylacy@msn.com
(909) 856-2188

Robert Howard
Region V Local 246
rob.howard@uwua246.com
(760) 828-3058


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